Where to See Tasmanian Devils in Tasmania: An Ultimate Guide

tasmanian devil devils at cradle

Nestled in the southern hemisphere, where rugged landscapes meet untamed wilderness, lies the island state of Tasmania – a haven for nature and wildlife enthusiasts. Among the myriad of unique and captivating creatures that call this pristine island home, one iconic species that stands out with its fierce charm and untamed spirit is the Tasmanian devil. Native only to Tasmania, a trip to Tasmania isn’t complete without coming face to face with a Tasmanian devil.

In this guide, we uncover everything you need to know about Tasmanian devils in Tasmania, such as: where to see Tasmanian devils in captivity, where to see Tasmanian devils in the wild, the best times to see Tasmanian devils, whether Tasmanian devils are dangerous and so much more. So pack your bag, grab your camera and prepare for an incredible journey to meet these charming and unique marsupials who are iconic to Tasmania.

Where to See Tasmanian Devils In Tasmania In Captivity

Spotting the elusive Tasmanian devil in its natural habitat proves to be a challenging quest. With an extremely low population, coupled with their nocturnal habits and aversion to human presence, wild encounters are a rare occurrence. For those yearning to witness these iconic marsupials without leaving it to chance, seeing them in captivity is the surefire solution.

There are many exceptional wildlife parks and sanctuaries in Tasmania where you can see Tasmanian devils up close. They not only provide a rare glimpse into the lives of Tasmanian devils but also play a crucial role in their preservation through dedicated conservation efforts and educational initiatives.

Below we’ve listed the best places to see Tasmanian devils in Tasmania.

1. Devils@Cradle

Nestled in the heart of Tasmania’s famous Cradle Mountain, Devils@Cradle is a perfect spot for wildlife enthusiasts eager to see Tasmanian devils in Tasmania. The sanctuary is focused on Tasmania’s three largest carnivorous marsupials, housing Tasmanian devils, spotted-tail quolls and eastern quolls.

With 50+ Tasmanian devils at all different stages of life; from mothers and joeys (during season), juveniles who are just learning the way of the world, breeding age adults and retired devils, their Tasmanian devil offering is varied and unique. Spanning various ages and distinct social groups within the sanctuary, this diversity provides visitors the rare opportunity to witness completely different behaviours and interactions from the devils, depending on their age and social structure.

Visitors to Devils@Cradle can enjoy wandering through the sanctuary at their own leisure, watching the devils sun bathe, play fight, explore, sleep or look for food. Once you’ve wandered around the sanctuary you can join the included day keeper tours where one of the keepers provide insights into the fascinating behaviours, ecology and conservation efforts surrounding Tasmanian devils. If you wish you can also book in for one of their additional tours such as their day feeding tour, their joey encounter or their after dark feeding tour.

For those seeking a diverse, immersive and insightful experience seeing Tasmanian devils in Tasmania, Devils@Cradle is the perfect spot to go.

Location: Devils@Cradle is located in Cradle Mountain. It’s approximately; a 2 hour drive from Launceston, a 1 hour and 15 minute drive from Devonport and a 4 hour drive from Hobart.

Cost: At the time of writing this (December 2023) the fees for Devils@Cradle are as follows.

  • General entry is $25 per adult and $15 per child (4-15 years old).
  • Day feeding tours are $37.50 per adult and $20 per child (4-15 years old).
  • Joey encounters are $75 per adult and $50 per child (4-15 years old).
  • After dark feeding tours are $37.50 per adult and $20 per child (4-15 years old).
  • Their sunset experience is $99 per adult and $75 per child (4-15 years old).

They also offer concession and family passes, refer to their website for the pricing of these.

tasmanian devils sun bathing

2. Trowunna Wildlife Park

Sat amongst the picturesque landscapes of Tasmania, Trowunna Wildlife Park is another fantastic spot for seeing Tasmanian devils up close. Committed to caring for injured and orphaned wildlife, the sanctuary houses native Tasmanian animals who; are part of a breeding program, are being rehabilitated for soft release or are unable to be released into the wild.

Trowunna also have a number of Tasmanian devils, young and old, offering a unique perspective of the different behaviours, appearance and interactions between devils of differing ages. Check out the devil ‘retirement home’, watch the rambunctious social group of adult devils and (during the right time of year) see cute devil joeys.

Take your time strolling through their sanctuary, meeting all of the unique animals, including their resident Tasmanian devils. Enjoy watching the devils ‘do what devils do’ before joining one of their free interactive tours, which not only includes meeting a Tasmanian devil but includes feeding a social group of adult devils. If you wish for a more private tour you can book in for one of their VIP or Trowunna Experience tours.

If you’re looking for an engaging and interactive experience seeing Tasmanian devils (and other native Tasmanian wildlife), Trowunna Wildlife Park is a must visit.

Location: Trowunna Wildlife Park is located in Mole Creek. It’s approximately; a 1 hour drive from Launceston, a 1 hour drive from Devonport and a 3 hour drive from Hobart.

Cost: At the time of writing this (December 2023) the fees for Trowunna Wildlife Park are as follows.

  • General admission is $30 per adult and $18 per child (3-15 years old).
  • VIP tours are $90 per person per hour (for a minimum of 2 people).
  • Trowunna Experience half-day tours are $300 per person (for a minimum of 4 people).

They also offer concession and family passes, refer to their website for the pricing of these.

tasmanian devils trowunna
Image taken from the Trowunna Wildlife Park website

3. East Coast Natureworld

Situated on the scenic east coast of Tasmania, East Coast Natureworld is the ideal spot for travellers along the east coast who want to see a Tasmanian devil in a unique coastal setting. The wildlife park guarantees you’ll see a Tasmanian devil during your visit but you’ll also have the opportunity to meet lots of other Tasmanian and Australian native animals, including; wallabies, wombats, echidnas, quolls and sugar gliders.

With a huge group of social devils sharing an enclosure you get to enjoy watching them interacting with each other; picking fights, chasing one another, sharing a meal and sunbathing. If you’re visiting during the right season, the wildlife park will also have adorable devil joeys.

Set on 150 acres of stunning coastal bushland and lagoons, enjoy wandering around at your own leisure, taking in the scenery and checking out the resident Tasmanian devils and other native animals who call East Coast Natureworld home. Make sure to jump in on one of their included feeding tours to witness a group of Tasmanian devils eating, while you watch, the keeper leading the demonstration will talk about the ecology and conservation of Tasmanian devils. If you want to meet devil joeys or want to join the devils after dark experience you can book one of their additional tours.

If you want to see Tasmanian devils while travelling along Tasmania’s east coast make sure to visit East Coast Natureworld.

Location: East Coast Natureworld is located in Bicheno. It’s approximately; a 2 hour and 15 minute drive from Launceston, a 3 hour drive from Devonport and a 2 hour and 30 minute drive from Hobart.

Cost: At the time of writing this (December 2023) the fees for East Coast Natureworld are as follows.

  • General admission is $32 per adult and $19 per child (3-15 years old).
  • Devils In The Dark experiences are $92 per adult and $67 per child (3-15 years old).
  • Baby Devil Encounters are $60 per person (minimum age 6 years old).
  • Ultimate Nature World Experience tours cost $250 per person.

They also offer concession and family passes, refer to their website for the pricing of these.

tasmanian devil east coast natureworld
Image taken from the East Coast Natureworld Facebook page

4. Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary

Just 30 minutes north of Hobart, visitors can have an up-close encounter with Tasmanian devils at Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary. Renowned for its dedication to wildlife rescue, rehabilitation, conservation and education, Bonorong provides a heartwarming experience that extends beyond a mere glimpse at Tasmania’s native wildlife.

With just a handful of Tasmanian devils in the sanctuary, enjoy admiring them sun bathe and explore their enclosures while learning their unique stories and why they aren’t fit for release.

Explore the sanctuary on your own time, meeting the incredible animals who call Bonorong home (including the Tasmanian devils). After exploring the sanctuary and hand feeding the friendly free-roaming kangaroos, make sure to join the included daily tour where you will get to meet and learn about some of the animals at Bonorong, including their Tasmanian devils. If you’re interested you can also book in for a feeding tour or night tour for a once in a lifetime up-close encounter with all of the animals.

If you want to directly support the rescue, rehabilitation, release and conservation of Tasmania’s native wildlife while getting to see a Tasmanian devil, this is how.

Location: Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary is located in Bicheno. It’s approximately; a 2 hour and 15 minute drive from Launceston, a 3 hour drive from Devonport and a 30 minute drive from Hobart.

Cost: At the time of writing this (December 2023) the fees for Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary are as follows.

  • General admission is $33.50 per adult and $19.50 per child (3-15 years old).
  • Feeding Frenzy tours are $172 per adult and $94.50 per child (3-15 years old).
  • Night tours are $172 per adult and $94.50 per child (3-15 years old).
  • Private Premium Feeding Frenzy tours are $388 per adult and $173 per child (3-15 years old).
  • Private Premium Night tours are $388 per adult and $173 per child (3-15 years old).

They also offer family and annual passes, refer to their website for the pricing of these.

tasmanian devil bonorong wildlife sanctuary
Image taken from the Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary website

5. Huon Valley Caravan Park

Offering the best of both worlds, with a place to spend the night and the opportunity to see a Tasmanian devil feeding, is the Huon Valley Caravan Park. Set amongst the breathtaking landscapes of Tasmania’s Huon Valley, the caravan park is located on a beautiful farm.

The caravan park has a small group of Tasmanian devils who call it home as part of the Save the Tassie Devil Program. The Tasmanian devils aren’t on display 24/7 but you can enjoy the exhilarating experience of watching them eat together on their daily feeding demonstration.

During the day enjoy exploring the Huon Valley and surrounding area or taking in everything the caravan park has to offer, such as; kayaking and fishing in the Huon River, looking for platypus, playing in the foam machine and toasting marshmallows over the communal campfires. Make sure you’re ready for the farm show and Tasmanian devil feeding which runs every day at 4pm. Here you’ll get to witness a group of Tasmanian devils sharing a meal.

If you’re looking for a place to spend the night and you want to see a Tasmanian devil during your time in Tasmania, make sure to book a night (or multiple nights!) at the Huon Valley Caravan Park.

Location: Huon Valley Caravan Park is located in Huonville. It’s approximately; a 3 hour and 15 minute drive from Launceston, a 4 hour drive from Devonport and a 30 minute drive from Hobart.

Cost: At the time of writing this (December 2023) the fees for Huon Valley Caravan Park are as follows.

  • Powered sites are $50 per night.
  • Unpowered sites are $50 per night.
  • Premium river sites are $60 per night.

Prices are based on 2 people per site. Each additional person is $25 per night and children (up to 15 years old) are $10 per night.

tasmanian devil huon valley caravan park
Image taken from the Huon Valley Caravan Park Facebook page

6. Tasmanian Devil Unzoo

Sat on the Tasman Peninsula is another popular spot for seeing the iconic Tasmanian devil, the Tasmanian Devil Unzoo. Known for their innovative ‘unzoo’ concept that emphasises a more natural approach to wildlife encounters, the Tasmanian Devil Unzoo mostly houses wild animals and only has a few animals in captivity, such as their Tasmanian devils.

The Unzoo has a small group of older Tasmanian devils from ex-research breeding programs, enjoy watching them laze around in the sun, run around their enclosure and enjoy a meal. If you’re lucky you may be able to have a nose-to-nose encounter with a devil in their ‘Devil Den’, which is a clear dome on the floor of a devil enclosure that you can enter and look around in.

Take your time walking along the 2km of nature trails, looking for the wild animals who call the Tasmanian Devil Unzoo home along the way. Afterwards, enjoy hand feeding the friendly kangaroos before joining one of their included presentations such as the Tasmanian devil feeding. In the Tasmanian devil feeding presentation you’ll get to hear all about Tasmanian devils from an expert guide while watching a devil being fed.

If you’re travelling through the Tasman Peninsula and want to see a Tasmanian devil up-close, make sure to drop by the Tasmanian Devil Unzoo.

Location: Tasmanian Devil Unzoo is located in Taranna. It’s approximately; a 3 hour drive from Launceston, a 4 hour drive from Devonport and a 1 hour drive from Hobart.

Cost: At the time of writing this (December 2023) the fees for Tasmanian Devil Unzoo are as follows.

  • General admission is $49 per adult and $28 per child (4-16 years old).
  • The Devil Tracker Adventure tour is $225 per adult and $125 per child (8-16 years old).
tasmanian devil unzoo
Image taken from the Tasmanian Devil Unzoo website

7. Zoodoo Zoo

Another prominent destination close to Hobart, for those eager to see a Tasmanian devil in person is Zoodoo Zoo. More of a ‘traditional zoo’ Zoodoo features native Australian animals like the incredible Tasmanian devil, alongside non-native animals like lions, meerkats and zebras.

With a couple of Tasmanian devil enclosures on site you’ll get the chance to see a few different Tasmanian devils of varying ages.

Explore the entire zoo on your own time or jump in on one (or multiple) of their daily animal presentations, such as the ‘Tassie Devil Tales’, where keepers provide greater insight on these amazing creatures. If you’re interested you can book in for one of their additional Tasmanian devil feeding encounters.

If you’re looking for a fun day out at the zoo and wish to see a Tasmanian devil during your time in Tasmania, make sure to pop by Zoodoo Zoo.

Location: Zoodoo Zoo is located in Tea Tree. It’s approximately; a 2 hour drive from Launceston, a 3 hour drive from Devonport and a 30 minute drive from Hobart.

Cost: At the time of writing this (December 2023) the fees for Zoodoo Zoo are as follows.

  • General admission is $37 per adult and $21 per child (3-15 years old).
  • Tasmanian Devil encounters are $60 for up to 2 people.
  • The Aussie Legends animal encounter package is $150 per person.
  • Keeper for a Day experiences are $270 per person.

They also offer concessions, annual passes and family passes, refer to their website for the pricing of these.

tasmanian devil zoodoo
Image taken from the Zoodoo Zoo website

8. Tasmania Zoo

Another traditional zoo where you can see the Tasmanian devil in person is Tasmania Zoo. The zoo houses over 100 exotic and native species with animals such as giraffes, tigers, wombats and little penguins on display.

The zoo features 3 Tasmanian devil enclosures which house small groups of Tasmanian devils. This provides the perfect opportunity for visitors to see them chasing each other and exploring their enclosures together. As Tasmania Zoo has a dedicated Tasmanian devil conservation breeding program, if you’re visiting during the right time of year, they often have little Tasmanian devil joeys also.

Appreciate the diverse range of animals they have throughout the zoo before joining one (or many) of the included keeper talks and feeding demonstrations such as the Tasmanian devil demonstration, A Devil of a Time Awaits.

If you’re wondering where to see a Tasmanian devil in Tasmania’s north, consider visiting the Tasmania Zoo.

Location: Tasmania Zoo is located in Riverside. It’s approximately; a 20 minute drive from Launceston, a 1 hour drive from Devonport and a 2 hour and 40 minute drive from Hobart.

Cost: At the time of writing this (December 2023) the fees for Tasmania Zoo are as follows.

  • General admission is $37.50 per adult and $22 per child (2-15 years old).
  • Tasmanian Devil encounters are $25 per person.

They also offer concessions, annual passes and family passes, refer to their website for the pricing of these.

tasmanian devil tasmania zoo
Image taken from the Tasmania Zoo website

9. Wing’s Wildlife Park

Wing’s Wildlife Park is a family run wildlife park, with over 150 different species of Australian animals, exotic animals and farm animals on display. The wildlife park is a popular spot to visit for those wanting to see a Tasmanian devil during their time in Tasmania’s north.

The park has a group of Tasmanian devils who call it home, with two devil enclosures. Here you can witness adult Tasmanian devils interacting with each other; chasing each other and snoozing together. If you’re visiting during the right season the park also has adorable Tasmanian devil joeys.

Take your time wandering through the wildlife park and farm animals area. At 1pm make your way over to the devil enclosures to witness a devil feeding. If you’re interested in getting up-close to a Tasmanian devil joey book in for the additional devil encounter where an expert keeper will let you pat and get a picture with one.

If you’re looking for an immersive and diverse wildlife experience while on your quest to see a Tasmanian devil in Tasmania, visit Wing’s Wildlife Park.

Location: Wings Wildlife Park is located in Gunns Plains. It’s approximately; a 1 hour and 40 minute drive from Launceston, a 40 minute drive from Devonport and a 4 hour drive from Hobart.

Cost: At the time of writing this (December 2023) the fees for Wings Wildlife Park are as follows.

  • General admission is $32 per adult and $18 per child (3-15 years old).
  • Tasmanian Devil encounters are $60 per person.
  • Personalised Guided Tours are $189 per person for a minimum of 2 people.

They also offer concessions, annual passes and family passes, refer to their website for the pricing of these.

tasmanian devil wings wildlife park
Image taken from the Wings Wildlife Park Facebook page

Where to See Tasmanian Devils In Tasmania In The Wild

As mentioned previously, seeing a Tasmanian devil in the wild is extremely rare, given their endangered status, nocturnal habits and aversion to human presence. Yet, there are reports of occasional sightings in the wild. Tasmanian devils are elusive so if you want a guaranteed sighting during your time in Tasmania we’d recommend visiting one of the sanctuaries, zoos or wildlife parks listed previously. However, for the most patient, observant or just straight up lucky wildlife enthusiasts, sightings in the wild are possible.

Below we’ve listed the places where Tasmanian Devils have been seen in the wild in Tasmania. We’ve gathered these from publicly mentioned sightings (in Facebook groups, on Google reviews, etc.).

  • Tarkine Drive (North West Tasmania) – We found a lot of reports of people seeing Tasmanian devils all along the Tarkine Drive. If you’re camping during your time in Tasmania it could be worth spending a night at the Julius River Campsite, the free campsite is situated along the Tarkine Drive and multiple reviews mentioned seeing Tasmanian devils here.
  • Marrawah (North West Tasmania) – Just north of the entry point to the Arthur-Pieman Conservation Area (and the Tarkine Drive). There have been a few reports seeing Tasmanian devils running along the beach in Marrawah. If you’re camping, there is a free campsite called Marrawah Green Point Campground that could be worth staying at, however none of its reviews mentioned seeing Tasmanian devils.
  • Maria Island (South East Tasmania) – We saw quite a few reports online of people seeing Tasmanian devils dotted around Maria Island. The sightings weren’t in one particular location and seemed to be quite random, with sightings on walking trails or accommodation spots around the island. A healthy population of 28 Tasmanian devils were released on Maria Island in 2012 and 2013, within a few years the population was estimated to have grown to 100.
  • Tasman Peninsula (South East Tasmania) – While we didn’t see any reports online of people seeing Tasmanian devils on the Tasman Peninsula, we personally spotted a huge amount of bones and Tasmanian devil poo along the Cape Raoul trail (you can see this in our YouTube video on the Cape Raoul hike and surrounding area). The area also had multiple warning signs to keep an eye out for Tasmanian devils on the road and had signs on the area being a Tasmanian devil recovery area. Unfortunately we also spotted two Tasmanian devils as roadkill when driving in to the Tasman Peninsula.
  • Mount Field National Park (South West Tasmania) – We saw a couple of mentions in Facebook groups of people seeing Tasmanian devils throughout the Mount Field National Park at night. However we weren’t able to find any more reports confirming this in Google reviews or at the campsites there.
  • Strahan and Zeehan (West Coast Tasmania) – We saw multiple mentions in Facebook groups of people seeing Tasmanian devils while driving between Strahan and Zeehan. We weren’t able to find any other sources confirming this.
  • Cradle Mountain (Central Tasmania) – We saw a few mentions in Facebook groups of people seeing Tasmanian devils at night while staying in accommodation at Cradle Mountain. While volunteering at Devils@Cradle we spotted a few Tasmanian devil poos outside the sanctuary but never saw any.
tasmanian devil on log

Frequently Asked Questions About Tasmanian Devils

As you continue your search to see Tasmanian devils in Tasmania, you’re bound to find your curiosity ignited with questions surrounding the fascinating traits and behaviours that set these unique animals apart. In this section we answer the most frequently asked questions about Tasmanian devils, such as; how big Tasmanian devils are, what they eat, what they sound like, how many babies they have and what their bite force is!

What is a Tasmanian Devil?

The Tasmanian devil is a carnivorous marsupial that is native to the island state of Tasmania, in Australia.

What Type of Animal is a Tasmanian Devil?

Tasmanian devils are carnivorous marsupials.

What Does a Tasmanian Devil Look Like?

Tasmanian devils are often referred to as looking like a small dog. They have a large broad head, short legs, a short muzzle and a somewhat stocky build. Their fur is predominantly black but they can have white markings on their chest or rump. They also have a wide jaw with sharp teeth.

Tasmanian devils have fluffy thick tails, with fat tails being an indicator of good health in a Tasmanian devil, as they store fat in their tails. They also have wide, mostly-hairless, pink ears. The ears are made of thin skin with lots of blood vessels so when a devil gets excited or agitated, blood flows to the ears and they begin to look red.

tasmanian devil facing camera bright ears

How Big is a Tasmanian Devil?

Tasmanian devils are the size of a small dog, varying in length from 57cm-65cm and standing at about 30cm tall. Males are generally larger than females.

How Much Does a Tasmanian Devil Weigh?

Adult Tasmanian devils typically weigh between 5-12kg. Males are generally larger than females, averaging a weight of 8kg while females average a weight of 6kg. Their weight varies depending on factors such as age, health and availability of food.

large old tasmanian devil

Are Tasmanian Devils Dangerous or Aggressive?

Tasmanian devils are very timid and typically avoid human contact, meaning they aren’t dangerous or a threat to humans as long as you respect their space. While they prefer to flee than fight, if they are attacked or trapped they will defend themselves. As devils have powerful jaws and a strong bite force they can cause serious injury if they bite you.

tasmanian devil open mouth teeth jaw

What Does a Tasmanian Devil Sound Like?

Tasmanian devils are known for being noisy with distinctive (and often eerie) vocalisations. From snorts and sneezes to high-pitched screams and screeches. The iconic Tasmanian devil scream is high-pitched and raspy.

If you want to hear the noises Tasmanian devils make for yourself you can in our Youtube video, the link we’ve added is timestamped to a snippet of the iconic devil screams.

What Does a Tasmanian Devil Eat?

Tasmanian devils are typically scavengers rather than hunters, eating carrion. As opportunistic feeders, they consume a wide range of prey, including mammals, birds, reptiles and fish. Native animals such as pademelons, wallabies, possums and wombats are a favourite for devils. They will eat every part of the animal, including the bones and fur.

As you’re travelling through Tasmania please move any roadkill off the road (when and where it’s safe to do so). Unfortunately as scavengers Tasmanian devils often get hit by cars as they’re eating roadkill so moving roadkill off the road helps protect Tasmanian devils and other carnivorous marsupials (such as eastern quolls and spotted tail quolls).

If you are lucky enough to see a Tasmanian devil in the wild make sure to treat it with respect; maintain a safe distance from it and refrain from trying to chase, touch or handle it. If you come across an injured Tasmanian devil please reach out to the appropriate rescue service, in Tasmania this is Bonorong Wildlife Rescue who are Tasmania’s largest 24-hour wildlife rescue service. You can contact them on 0447 264 625.

How Does the Tasmanian Devil Move?

Tasmanian devils are ground-dwelling marsupials who are known for their lumbering gait as they ‘amble around’ and run from place to place. With front legs that are longer than their back legs, Tasmanian devils run with a rocking motion, similar to a rocking horse.

How Fast is a Tasmanian Devil?

Tasmanian devils are actually quite slow, with a top running speed of up to 13km/h.

Can Tasmanian Devils Climb?

While Tasmanian devils are primarily ground-dwelling marsupials who are typically not known for their climbing abilities, young devils can be quite strong climbers. Young Tasmanian devils climb trees to avoid older Tasmanian devils when they first leave mum and venture off into the wild. As Tasmania devils age they get less agile and lose their climbing abilities, only being capable of climbing small obstacles like fallen logs and rocks.

We took these photos during our time volunteering at Devils@Cradle. If you look very carefully you can see a little devil joey high up in the tree in the photo on the left. The photo on the right is the same joey in the same spot on the tree, when leaving the sanctuary this is what we could see from behind.

Can Tasmanian Devils Swim?

While Tasmanian devils are primarily ground-dwelling marsupials they are decent swimmers who can cross rivers and bodies of water if they need to. They are also known to splash, sit in or lay in water, especially to stay cool on hot days.

Where Does the Tasmanian Devil Live?

Tasmanian devils are widespread across Tasmania living in coastal heath, open dry sclerophyll forest and mixed sclerophyll-rainforest. They prefer open forests and woodlands but can live anywhere they can find shelter during the day and food at night.

tasmanian devil stood on log side profile

When are Tasmanian Devils Active?

In the wild Tasmanian devils are primarily nocturnal, particularly in areas that are frequented by people. This means they are most active during the night, retreating during the day to their dens and foraging at night. In wilderness areas however they are known to come out in daylight to forage and love to lay out in the sun.

In most sanctuaries, Tasmanian devils are seemingly less nocturnal and have an increase in daytime activity. This is likely associated with daytime feeding times which encourage the devils to be out during the day. This way visitors can still see Tasmanian devils during traditional open hours.

tasmanian devil sun bathing close up

Where do Tasmanian Devils Sleep?

Tasmanian devils typically sleep in dens made in hollow logs, abandoned wombat burrows, rock piles, log piles, caves, dense vegetation or under buildings.

tasmanian devil sleeping

How Did the Tasmanian Devil Get its Name?

Tasmanian devils got their name from European settlers who heard them screaming throughout the night. They thought the unearthly screams and growls that were coming from deep within the bush sounded like devils.

tasmanian devil open mouth

How Long Does the Tasmanian Devil Live?

In the wild, the lifespan of a Tasmanian devil is typically around 4-5 years, with very few living longer than 6 years. Various factors influence their longevity including predation, competition for resources and exposure to diseases (such as the Devil Facial Tumour Disease).

In captivity, where they are protected from the threats present in the wild, Tasmanian devils can live up to 8 years.

How Many Babies Does a Tasmanian Devil Have?

A Tasmanian devil gives birth to 20-40 joeys the size of a grain of rice. The mother devil only has four teats however so the joeys must race from her birth canal to her pouch in order to survive. The joeys that make it into the pouch and onto the teat will then stay in mom’s pouch for about 4 months.

Are Tasmanian Devils on the Mainland?

No, unfortunately there are no wild Tasmanian devils on the mainland. They used to live on the mainland but got wiped out a long time ago because of the introduction of the dingo.

Why is the Tasmanian Devil Endangered?

The Tasmanian devil is listed as endangered primarily due to the threat of Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD), a highly contagious and deadly cancer that has devastating effects on Tasmanian devil populations.

Tasmanian devils were initially widespread and in abundance across Tasmania. However, European settlers thought that Tasmanian Devils were preying on their farm animals so they resorted to hunting and poisoning them, even having a bounty on Tasmanian devils, paying anyone who killed them. This almost wiped Tasmanian devils out completely until the government stepped in and did something about it, after the death of the last thylacine. The Tasmanian Devils were made protected by law in 1941.

The population then started rebounding until the early 90s when a horrible disease called the Devil Facial Tumour Disease was discovered. The disease is spread through biting and results in tumours forming in and around the devils mouth, interfering with their feeding and eventually leading to death by starvation. The rapidly spreading disease quickly killed majority of the population and sadly there’s no cure. Scientists are currently working hard on vaccines and designated sanctuaries are part of breeding programs that are responsible for building up the insurance population of Tasmanian devils.

Another big threat for Tasmanian devils is road mortality. As carnivorous marsupials, Tasmanian devils often venture onto roads to eat roadkill, resulting in them being hit on the roads also. Due to their dark colouring Tasmanian devils are particularly hard to spot by drivers. Road mortality is believed to be the second biggest threat to Tasmanian devils after the Devil Facial Tumour Disease.

tasmanian devil adult male

Where Can You See Tasmanian Devils In Tasmania?

  1. Devils@Cradle
  2. Trowunna Wildlife Park
  3. East Coast Natureworld
  4. Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary
  5. Huon Valley Caravan Park
  6. Tasmanian Devil Unzoo
  7. Zoodoo Zoo
  8. Tasmania Zoo
  9. Wing’s Wildlife Park

Where Can You See Tasmanian Devils In Tasmania In The Wild?

  1. Tarkine Drive (North West Tasmania)
  2. Marrawah (North West Tasmania)
  3. Maria Island (South East Tasmania)
  4. Tasman Peninsula (South East Tasmania)
  5. Mount Field National Park (South West Tasmania)
  6. Strahan and Zeehan (West Coast Tasmania)
  7. Cradle Mountain (Central Tasmania)

Enjoy Your Adventure to See Tasmanian Devils in Tasmania!

That’s the end of our guide on everything you need to know about seeing Tasmanian devils in Tasmania. We hope we’ve helped you pick where you want to see Tasmanian devils and we hope we’ve provided you with valuable insights on the unique behaviours and characteristics of devils to enhance your appreciation and knowledge of this incredible creature.

Want to see other unique animals during your time in Tasmania? Check out our other guides:

Watch Our Experience Seeing Tasmanian Devils in Tasmania!

If you’d like to you can watch our YouTube video where we spent two weeks volunteering at Devils@Cradle. We show a lot of clips of their amazing animals (Tasmanian devils, eastern quolls and spotted tail quolls) and talk about the unique personalities of the Tasmanian devils we met.

Lydia
Lydia

Hey! I’m Lydia.

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